Skip to main content

About your Search

20130201
20130228
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
as for the city of new york, the state and the nation. i'm proud that we have been joined by several distinguished members of the congressional black caucus, which for more than four decades has been known as the conscience of the congress. and in that capacity, the congressional black caucus has year after year spent time trying to perfect our democracy and create a more perfect union. we confront that moment right now here in this great country of ours as we try and figure out how we deal with creating a pathway towards citizenship for the more than 11 million undocumented immigrants who are forced to toil in the shadow. we have been joined today as co-anchor for this next hour, distinguished classmate of mine from the great state of nevada, mr. horsford, who had the opportunity to be present while president obama delivered his remarks as it relates to immigration reform. and so i would like to ask mr. horsford if he might comment on the president's remarks and weigh in on the immigration debate from his perspective as a representative from an important state in nevada. mr. horsford: thank you,
at the unemployed host: this was advanced by an act from the new york city council. what did it say? guest: the new york city council passed legislation to make it illegal to refuse to consider somebody for a job solely because they are unemployed. it does not mandate that employers must hire unemployed people. it does not even mandate that employers must interview unemployed people what it does say is that the status of being unemployed in and of itself is not a disqualifying job characteristic. it is not something that an employer could use to say she is not working so put her aside. it requires employers to consider all qualified applicants on a fair basis. host: if a person felt they were discriminated against, how could they prove it? guest: there is lots of concern about trial lawyers and lawsuits. people are going to need evidence. they will need to that job ad has line was that either explicitly or implicitly makes it clear that the unemployed are not welcome. they would need statements either from hiring professionals, people somewhere in the process, a lot of workers have called us over t
traffic control towers and smaller cities. lawmakers have until march 1 until automatic spending cuts -- spending cuts are expected to take effect. this is a little less than an hour. >> i remember all of you from roll call. [laughter]you asked me all the3se dumb questions. [laughter] >> i just want to say that it is my pleasure, and clearly yours, to have with me today the secretary of transportation, ray lahood, who is here to speak with you about the impacts of sequester, if it comes to pass, on the american travel industry. and as we've talked about a lot, the indiscriminate, deep cuts will affect everyone, really, in america, and industries. and secretary lahood is here to discuss one aspect of that with you and to take some questions. and afterwards, i'll be here to take questions on other issues. i just want to remind you that we're on a slightly constrained time schedule. we have the president's meeting with national governors -- democratic governors, and then also the pool spray with the prime minister of japan. with that, i turn it over to secretary lahood. >> sequester will
of poverty in the next decade alone. city kids are going back to work. farmers are having their own online dating service. the most talked about super bowl commercial, courtesy of the late harvey, was a heartwarming tribute to the american farmer. what is that kenny chesney song? "she thinks my tractor is sexy"? there is some truth to that. agricultural issues are, if not sexy, increasingly important. i'm glad to be here. it is appropriate that we are here today. it turns out that it was february 21, 1865 -- 148 years ago today, that the u.s. patent office issued a patent. i will not give you a pop quiz. it was labeled john deere plow. the implement sketched out could have easily been labeled one of the most important inventions in history. they called it the plow that broke the plains, and it did. by replacing cast iron with smooth innovation, it opened up swaths of land for cultivation. it made it possible for my hometown to exist. beforehand, tilling an acre took a full 24 hours. afterward, as little as five. every toil ended another assumption of what the land could produce. it is not
the most of the guns had rested because the government of the city of new orleans did not give a never mind and left the guns in an exposed condition and in rather extreme humidity that they experience there, so the guns or ruined. oh, too bad. host: what statement did gun owners of america make after sandy hook? guest: following sandy hook, gun owners of america was pretty outraged. we pointed out that the politicians have to accept some blame for what happened, for having facilitated what happened in sandy hook. all of the mass murders in our country in the last 20 years with one exception have occurred in legally-required gun-free zones. these are places where you just are not allowed to legally have a gun. and whether it was a mall in utah, whether it was a theater in colorado, or whether it was at this school -- typically it has been at schools, that is where these mass murders occurred. our response that was let's get rid of the laws that require people to be disarmed, precisely in places where the mass murders have occurred. host: harrison, nebraska, good morning. caller: hello, the
office. he grew up in lake city, calif., population less than 100. we welcome his family, including mom and dad, tisch and gary. i hope you do not mind that we share that he was actually born at home. these days, clinton works in the oilfields of north dakota. he is a man of faith. and after more than a decade in uniform, he says the thing he looks forward to the most is just being a husband and father. in fact, this is not even the biggest event for clinton this week. because tomorrow, he and his wife, tammy, will celebrate their 13th wedding anniversary. this is probably not the intimate kind of anniversary you -- planned. [laughter] arewe're so glad that you here, along with your three children. colin is not as shy as clinton. [laughter] he was racing around the oval office pretty good. and he sampled a number of the apples before he found the [laughter] -- the one that was just right. [laughter] to truly understand the act -- the extraordinary actions for which clinton is being honored, you need to understand the almost unbelievable conditions under which he and his troops serve. --
a few years ago i found myself sitting next to the mayor of salt lake city and he was a nice guy and we started talking about what i do for a living and i told him i work to encourage young women and girls to run for a political office. why, he said? which stumps me because in my world, the question of why we need more women, is not a question but how do we get more women there. he went on to say i have two daughters, i have a wife, i have a more, he said, i know what women need and what can women do in office that i can't do? and it was an interesting question and he had no idea what a can of worms he was opening by getting into this conversation with me because i really believe no matter how well intentioned a man in office is, his decisions are never going to be as strong if you have men and women legislating together. i'm happy to say in the years i started doing this work is the world has come around to this idea, the idea is we need to add women to leadership, not because it's fair or it's the right thing to do but because adding more women to leadership is going to make stronger
city. we have got to be more comfortable in talking to people about what works. what is working that other countries are doing. the diversity of the representation in the house will be helpful for that. i think also we have to learn something from how historically brave actions by your predecessors in this caucus played out in the electorate. when were they rewarded? when were they punished? and later rewarded? i cannot tell you how many nights in the white house, every single night before i went to bed, for months and months and months after the 1994 election, i thought about the people who were defeated because they voted for the economic program, because they voted for the assault weapons ban. i knew exactly what happened. i thought a lot about those who survived and why they did. as you look ahead and you decide, what are we going to do about the budget, what are we going to do about having the democrats branded as the party of jobs and innovation for the future? make no mistake about it, the republicans will try very hard not to make it as easy for you to win by-reference.
of the largest cities and in some smaller independent operators in smaller cities. a good part of the traffic has been people who stream it online, and that is a pretty dedicated following. in fact, with the very large online content, a good percentage of that comes from the united states. there is an appetite, clearly. how much of that will translate to a cable channel again where some of these folks are dedicated online streamers' is a challenge, but we hope we can provide interesting and freshen up content and have some people cross over. host: how will the recent purchase expand the american audience? who will you be able to reach now? >> -- guest: it is an estimated 50 million viewers. obviously it is a great leap forward and a great deal. one of the things we fought for years was distribution in the americas. this just opens some eyeballs to us, and we hope it will give people a chance to see our coverage, to sample it for those who have not seen it, and again, provide a platform for the core audience we already have. host: it is a 24-hour global news network carried in places like new york
to school. that did not happen in new york city. that is a different culture. that is what bill clinton was warning barack obama about. be careful because these people really care about their culture and their life and what they do. they care about different things than you do. part of it is cultural. when you ask somebody, or one of your leaders, you ask about the nra, we are viewed as an advocacy organization that stands up for gun owners and the second amendment. that is about 12%. the rest goes to competition, a gun safety, technical information, and a lot of our research goes into boy scouts, girl scout, bringing people into the shooting sport and teaching them to handle guns safely. there are fewer gun accidents today than there were at the beginning of the 20th century but there are a lot more guns. the only people out there teaching gun safety and training people is the national rifle association. i have got to go. [laughter] i have to go but i will take you to a gun show. [captioning performed by the national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite co
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)